MAY/JUNE 2020

$8.95

Description

Despite its name, Snow Canyon State Park is a playground amidst sandstone, with hiking and rock-climbing opportunities – and the potential for glimpses of the desert tortoise and Utah’s state reptile, the Gila monster. Story and photos by Dan Leeth.

A faded house poking from stagnant green water alongside U.S. 89 marks the existence of a once-bustling railroad town called Thistle, wiped out by a history-making mudslide and flood in 1983. Story by Vanessa Zimmer.

The Pony Express of 1860-61 and The Children of Light from the 2002 Winter Olympics are just two of the noteworthy sculptural tributes in Salt Lake City, Utah’s capital. Story by Vanessa Zimmer. Photographs by Brian Nicholson.

PLUS:

The mesmerizing eared grebe has an interesting life story, including the months it spends flightless on the Great Salt Lake.

A Box Elder County farm family created Marble Park, a quiet patch of land with life-size metal horses, milk-can seating and local history told through a parade of steel silhouettes.

Ron Russon of Lehi balances the earthy life of a farmer with his bright and distinctive paintings of Utah wildlife.

How Kit Carson came to etch a cross on a rock on Fremont Island.

Yes, Utah, fireflies do exist. They may be right in your own backyard.

Utah books: The publisher Gibbs Smith makes it easy to teach your children well about important women in Utah history, with Champions of Change: 25 Women Who Made History.

Utah Trivia: Test your knowledge of our state’s five national parks with Trivia Master Brian Wangsgard.

Fry sauce: Utah’s signature condiment gets a couple of make-it-at-home variations, along with some perfect companions, Buttermilk Chicken Tenders and Parmesan Garlic Oven Fries.

Poetry: Our poets take a journey with Butterflies and Flowers.

Mailbox: Readers look for the silver lining during these times of coronavirus-imposed social isolation.

Explore Utah: Activities and events in Utah are tenuous right now because of COVID-19. Call before you go.

Last Laugh: Humorist Kerry Soper takes the blame for a family camping tradition gone absolutely haywire.